Milkweed for Monarchs

A bright orange and black monarch butterfly sits on purp
A monarch butterfly flexes its wings in the Enchanted Garden at HCLS Miller Branch.

by Ann H.

Now is a great time to harvest and plant milkweed to support the dwindling monarch population. Milkweed is the host plant of the monarch butterfly. It is where monarch butterflies lay their eggs, and when the eggs hatch the tiny monarch larvae (caterpillars) start chomping away on their one and only food – milkweed leaves. Monarchs cannot complete their life cycle without milkweed. Common milkweed, Swamp milkweed, and Butterfly Weed are all native to Maryland and suitable for the butterflies as they journey through our state. The Enchanted Garden showcases vivid orange Butterfly Weed and, especially this year, an abundance of Common Milkweed. The latter one spreads easily. During the garden closure it found its way to our compost bins, the pathways, and between the rocks lining our stream!

Milkweed seeds are easy and fun to harvest. In the fall, fat pods dry on the plants and burst open to reveal hundreds of seeds in a single pod. Each seed is attached to silky fluff also called coma. That silky fluff allows the seed to float through the air with the hope of landing in fertile soil. You can pull the seeds from the fluff or put an open seed pod in a bag with some pennies for weight, close the bag and shake. The seeds will come loose from the fluff.

Collect and plant seeds now so the seeds get the winter chill or cold stratification they need to germinate in the spring. If you want to wait, put them in a bag in the freezer for a month and they’ll be ready for planting come spring.

Would you like to plant some milkweed? I am happy to share the many common milkweed pods I harvested from the Enchanted Garden. I’ll place a container of pods in front of the Enchanted Garden Gate on days I’m in the garden (see times below) and for as long as the supply lasts. Bring a small bag and take a couple pods home. Every seed planted has the potential to support our monarchs!

WHEN:
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday
October 19, 20, 21 & 26, 27, 28
9:30 am – 12:30 pm

You can find additional information about Monarchs in our HCLS collection.

For Adults

The Monarch: Saving Our Most-Loved Butterfly by Kylie Baumle

Monarchs and Milkweed: A Migrating Butterfly, a Poisonous Plant, and Their Remarkable Story of Co-evolution by Anurag Agrawal

For Children

Monarch Butterflies by Josh Gregory

Monarch Butterflies Matter by Cecilia Pinto McCarthy

Ann is a Master Gardener and the Enchanted Garden Coordinator at the HCLS Miller Branch, where she has worked for eight years. You can find her smiling in the garden and sharing her passion for plants, nature, and our community.

What’s Happening in the Enchanted Garden?

Sunflowers against a bright blue sky, with one of two blossoms beginning its end of season fade. A bright yellow goldfinch sits on the stalk.

By Ann H.

While the Enchanted Garden is temporarily closed to visitors and volunteers, it still manages to be a busy place for nature. Last year, the Enchanted Garden became a certified Wildlife Habitat thanks to the work of the Tween Sprouts (an HCLS youth garden club) and a loyal group of student and Master Gardener volunteers. This year it seems chipmunks, bunnies, butterflies, bees, birds, maybe a fox, plus more unseen critters are enjoying the efforts of our two-legged helpers. Let’s take a peek inside.

Birds helped spread sunflower seeds planted by youth gardeners in spring 2019. Come late this summer goldfinches, bees, and butterflies are feasting on their nectar and seeds!

Close up photo shows bright green mint plants that have begun to flower.

Mint must thrive on neglect! Many common herbs like basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary, and lemon balm are members of the hardy mint family. These herbs and more common mints like chocolate and spearmint are providing nectar for our hungry pollinators. Let your mint reach the flowering stage and pollinators will come.

Common milkweed left unchecked has claimed the back corner of the garden. Since it is the host plant of the monarch butterfly and mega food for a variety of pollinators, I’m enjoying its presence and hoping to see monarch caterpillars devouring the leaves any day.

Monarch butterfly rests on flowers of a summersweet plant.

Monarchs have not been plentiful in the Enchanted Garden so far this summer, but a few make a regular appearance. Thank goodness we have enough native perennials like this Summersweet, to help feed them on their journey.

Though the chore list to restore our Enchanted Garden is a tad long, these sights inspire me to persevere. I am grateful for the work of many in past years and truly look forward to the day we can open the gates to all our garden friends, volunteers, and visitors.

Ann is the Enchanted Garden Coordinator and Research Specialist at the Miller Branch. After nearly ten years with HCLS, she still thinks her position is a dream come true.

Gardening Delights

A small clump of bright red strawberries still on the stem hangs over the edge of the weathered wood of a garden box.

by Ann Hackeling.

Mention gardening and I smile. Gardening lifts my spirits and keeps me grounded at the same time. I like the feel of damp-crumbly soil, I like to see and imagine the zillions of creatures working together below ground to support life above ground. I feel thankful when new shoots burst through the soil and reach for the sky. My heart warms when I observe birds, bees, and butterflies visit the banquet table I prepare with them in mind.

Gardening makes me smile because I can play a small part in nurturing goodness and beauty from the earth. What I miss the most about the Enchanted Garden is sharing my joy with others. For the past eight years spring meant reconnecting with volunteers and the community in the
Enchanted Garden. My mornings were filled planting, weeding, watering, turning compost… with the help of fellow gardeners and in the company of library visitors. What a treat it was to share that first picked strawberry or witness a bee pollinate a tomato, together.

I am thrilled to be the Enchanted Garden Coordinator and can’t wait to see you in the garden. Until then, I hope you enjoy my On Demand Learning videos, available on the Library’s YouTube channel.

You can also find free online resources available via the Library’s website. You just need a Library card number and PIN. If you don’t have one, you can register for a temporary digital account.

Available to read as an eBook on RB Digital Books: 
Living with Nature Underfoot by John Hainze
Bringing Nature Home by Douglas W. Tallamy
The Intelligent Gardener by Steve Solomon
Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life by Marta McDowell
The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart

And there’s a couple of great magazines in Press Reader: 
Organic Gardener Magazine
Kids Go Gardening,
Kitchen Garden

and in RB Digital Magazines: 
Birds and Blooms
Mother Earth News
Rodale’s Organic Life

Ann is a Master Gardener and the Enchanted Garden Coordinator at the HCLS, where she has worked for HCLS for eight years. You can find her smiling in the garden and sharing her passion for plants, nature, and our community.