Explore Nature with April #ELKReads

Spring is here! Temperatures are warming, plants are budding and blooming, and animals are reemerging – including creepy crawlies that we might be less than enthusiastic to greet. As you welcome the change of seasons, here are some reads that celebrate the natural world. Take a look below to find titles for all ages, and keep an eye on our social media to see additional suggestions for each age group.

A colorful collage of "Nature PIcks for Little Kids" with purple mountains in the background. Titles include: 
Plant the Tiny Seed by Christie Matheson whose cover features bright flowers and red type.
Call Me Tree/Llámame árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez, which shows a boy in a green shirt and blue pants standing with arms outstretched in front of a tree.
Over and Under the Pond by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal shows a mother and child paddling along water and the rocks, reeds and fish under them.
The Invisible Garden by Valérie Picard and Marianne Ferrer has lush greenery enclosing a small girl in a blue dress.
What Does Bunny See? by Linda Sue Park and illustrated by Maggie Smith features a a small brown bunny in a colorful field.
Gator, Gator, Gator! by Daniel Bernstrom and illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon has clear crisp painting of a girl with binoculars in a boat in a bayou.
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For Little Kids:

What Does Bunny See? A Book of Colors and Flowers by Linda Sue Park, pictures by Maggie Smith

A rabbit explores a garden and finds flowers of every color, before hopping home for a nap and dreams of rainbows. Rhyming clues invite the reader to answer the question: What does bunny see? 

Over and Under the Pond by Kate Messner, illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal. Also available as an eBook.

Join your little one in discovering all the amazing creatures that live in the unique ecosystem of a mountain pond. As a boy and his mother paddle across the pond, they discover the interconnected nature of the creatures that call the pond home. Turn the pages to the end of the story to read facts about all the animals you see.

Call Me Tree = Llámame árbol by Maya Christina Gonzalez

Come balance, sway, sing, and stretch along with children imagining what it’s like to be a tree. Bright, colorful pictures show children of different backgrounds learning to embrace nature, each other, and themselves. The fun, singsong text is full of sweet affirmations written in both Spanish and English.

A colorful collage of "Nature PIcks for Big Kids" with purple mountains in the background. Titles include:
Wild in the Streets by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Gordy Wright, which features a monkey with a juvenile on her back with a city in the background.
Love, the Tiger by Frédéric Brrémaud art by Federico Bertolucci shows a leaping, snarling tiger in full color.
Pilu of the Woods by Mai K. Nguyen has the title encircled by leaves and a child centered at the bottom holding a white flower.
Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman features a grid of six squares with pictures of a Black man, a pticher, and a young white woman in the top row; and an eggplant, an older white woman, and a jumprope in the bottom row.
One Well by Rochelle Strauss's cover features a coastline next to a rich blue sea.
Extinct by Lucas Riera has a collage of extinct and endangered animals on a pale yellow cover.

For Big Kids:

Extinct: An Illustrated Exploration of Animals That Have Disappeared by Lucas Riera

Explore the gorgeous illustrations in this volume filled with information about the species that have vanished over the last century. Along with the tragic stories of how many of these species have been lost to the world, this book also shares inspiring tales of species that were rediscovered and some that were successfully reintroduced into the wild.

Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman. Also available in eBook and eAudiobook format.

A vacant lot in inner-city Cleveland, Ohio brings together a community in unexpected ways in this classic tale. Follow the stories of 13 diverse residents as they discover the power of gardening and working together to heal and make change.

Wild in the Streets by Marilyn Singer

This richly illustrated book combines poems with the fascinating backstories of 20 animals who’ve figured out how to thrive in cities. From reticulated pythons in Singapore’s sewer system to coyotes in Chicago, discover why these animals came to be such close neighbors with humans. At the end of the book, enjoy bonus pages on poetry forms and resources to learn more about these clever creatures.

A colorful collage of "Nature PIcks for Teens" with purple mountains in the background. Titles include:
Zen and Gone by Emily France's cover is deep blue with orange, yellow, and aqua stylized trees.
I Am Still Alive by Kate Alice Marshall has a stark black and white cover with a pen/ink drawing of pine trees.
Feral Youth by various authors (Shaun David Hutchinson + 9 others) shows legs walking beside a puddle, reflected in the water, in watery blues and black.
Consider the Platypus by Maggie Ryan Sandford has a deep teal cover with a white circle from which a platypus emerges.
Up to this Pointe by Jennifer Longo shows a girl in a parka and a pointe shoes, with glaciers in the background, on a medium blue background.
Unicorn Power! by Mariko Tamaki features the manga illustration of a red-haired girl in rappelling harness.

For Teens:

Consider the Platypus: Evolution through Biology’s Most Baffling Beasts by Maggie Ryan Sandford, illustrated by Rodica Prato 

This beautiful nonfiction volume explores some of the quirkiest creatures you can find, along with more common animal companions and friends. Beginning with Darwin’s theory of evolution, the author also explains how advances in scientific knowledge, especially genetics, have expanded our understanding of how animals became their current selves.

Feral Youth

This multi-authored novel tells the story of ten teens left alone in the wilderness for a three-day survival test. The diverse group of troubled teens have to overcome their vast differences to survive in the wild with no readily available food or water, just the packs on their backs.

Zen and Gone by Emily France. Also available as an eAudiobook.

When Oliver takes a summer trip from the bustling city of Chicago to Boulder, Colorado, he experiences a bit of a culture shock. There he meets Essa, a nature-loving girl who plays wilderness survival games with her friends. The two begin to explore Buddhism and meditation at the local Zendo. When one of their survival games goes wrong, the two have to rely on their newfound spiritual strength if they are to save Essa’s sister, Puck, and survive the trip themselves.

A colorful collage of "Nature Picks for Adults" with purple mountains in the background. Titles include:
Down from the Mountain by Bryce Andrews has a rim-lit sihouette of a grizzly bear against a black ground.
The Overstory by Richard Powers shows a painting of a stand of trees, with an inset circle of the same picture smaller.
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson has a the snout and ears of a brown bear peeking up from the bottom of the cover with green woods behind it.
The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart
has an old-fashioned typographical cover in greens and golds.
Gardenista by Michelle Slatalla shows the photo of a lush green garden on a misty morning.
Garden Renovation by Bobbie Schwartz features the photo of someone in an apron and gloves standing about potted decorative trees.

For Adults: 

Down from the Mountain: The Life and Death of a Grizzly Bear by Bryce Andrews. Also available in eBook and eAudiobook format.

In Montana’s Mission mountains, conservationist and rancher Bryce Andrews watches a young grizzly bear be tagged with a GPS collar. As the seasons pass, he tracks her through forests, cornfields, and cattle ranches as she struggles to feed herself (and later her two cubs) from a wilderness increasingly fractured by human use, while he works with farmers, hunters, and Native organizations to protect the bears. Tensions rise as bear encounters with humans and their property become more frequent and destructive, and, as a series of tragic events unfolds, Andrews eloquently wonders what can be done to find balance between these two species. While deeply personal and rooted firmly in the landscapes and culture of the American West, this story is also emblematic of global struggles where habitat loss is pushing wildlife into ever closer proximity with human settlements.

Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of your Dreams by Bobbie Schwartz

Spring is upon us, and maybe you want to venture into the yard and get ready for outdoor living! In Garden Renovation, you’ll find practical do-it-yourself plans to build or re-build your garden environment. Like many gardening and outdoor project books, the beautiful pictures are just as much fun to look at and dream over as they are instructive. If you decide to take on a project, don’t forget the DIY Education Center can help!

A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. Also available as an eBook, eAudiobooks on OverDrive or CloudLibraryaudiobook on CD, and as a Playaway.

If you’re not familiar with this humorous author, you are in luck, because we own many of his fantastic books. In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson recounts his discovery of and attempts to hike the Appalachian Trail. In this book, you are not inspired by the story of a very fit hiker doing the entire trail from Maine to Georgia in record time, but rather laugh along with the story of an average middle-aged person and his old friend hiking and discovering together. While very funny, Bryson also weaves interesting trail history and social commentary into his tale. I always recall his comments on how few people walk in the woods, and how, after days in the woods, the modern world seems harsh, especially for those on foot. Robert Redford produced and starred as Bryson in the film adaptation, available on DVD

The Elkridge Branch + DIY Education Center opened the doors of its new building in March 2018. Our staff are always happy to help you with your questions about books, tools, technology, and more!

The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative

The book cover depicts the profile of a human covered in maple leaves, with some of the leaves trailing off into the air as if windblown. The colors range from shades of green to yellow. orange, and red.

By Nina L.

Finding ways to increase our well-being during the pandemic has taken on greater significance than ever. Spending time outdoors, one of the few pastimes still available to us, may actually have greater benefits than we realize, according to The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative. Author Florence Wiliams, a contributing editor to Outside magazine and transplant to Washington, DC from Boulder, CO, felt depressed, irritable, and unable to focus after the move. Realizing that she missed the mountains and easy access to nature, Williams began asking, “…how much nature do we need to fix ourselves?” and, “What is it about nature that people seem to need?” Williams embarked on a two-year research project to learn the answers from scientists around the world.

Williams buoys up the factual and data-heavy text with sprinkles of humor evident in chapters titled, “How Many Neuro-Specialists Does It Take to Find the Stinking Milk Vetch?” and, “Squat Down and Touch the Plant.”  She subjected herself to wearing an EEG device strapped around her head while viewing the San Juan River, went on a kayaking trip with veterans suffering from PTSD, and visited countries including Japan, South Korea, Scotland, and Finland to understand what we can learn from other nations.

Many countries make access to and immersion in nature a national priority. In Japan, the practice of forest-bathing, or shinrin yoku, has been found to have quantifiable effects on health. The practice involves slowing down in order to open up to the sights, scents, textures, sounds, and even tastes of nature. Williams’ initiation into forest-bathing started with a warm cup of “mountain-grown, wasabi-root and bark flavored tea.” Later in the day she inhaled the scent of sugi pines, stretched out on a mossy boulder, and listened to the quacking of ducks. Afterwards, not surprisingly, her blood pressure measured several points lower.

Subsequent chapters fully explore the individual senses of smell, hearing, and sight. The hinoki cypress forests found in South Korea are full of beneficial phytoncides, a chemical released by plants. Beyond just smelling good, phytoncides boost the immune system, reduce blood pressure, lower cortisol, and improve concentration. The Korean Forest Agency offers guided trips through the forests to help cancer patients, children with allergies, and prenatal women, among others.

Similarly, just listening to a trickling stream can have a positive impact on our brain. Even as we tune them out, industrial sounds affect us negatively — traffic, planes, electric saws, and leaf blowers can all raise stress levels and deter alpha waves, while the opposite holds true of the sounds of nature. Enjoying beautiful scenery also activates “happy molecules.” Visual artist and physicist, Richard Taylor, studies fractal patterns found in nature such as in clouds, coastlines, and plant leaves. Exposure to fractal patterns activates brain regions that regulate emotions and reduces stress up to 60 percent by increasing alpha waves.

The Finns have found that a mere five hours a month spent in nature improves physical and emotional health. Recommendations for time outdoors can be compared to the food pyramid: short walks during the week, a weekend away once a month, and every year or two aspiring to spend a few weeks in a natural setting. Beyond benefits on an individual level, the increasing scientific evidence of how nature improves health can shape public policy decisions, such as how educators approach school recess, city planners provide urban green space, and architects design hospitals.

The wealth of evidence in The Nature Fix supports what many of us already know, that nature is good for us. Yet taking a deep dive into understanding the scientific research helped me override the temptation to stay on the couch and choose instead to find time in my day, even if just a little, to enjoy the rich and renewing effects of nature.

The Nature Fix is also available from HCLS as an ebook and an eaudiobook via Libby/OverDrive.

Nina L. is a Customer Service Specialist at the Miller Branch of HCLS. She loves art, yoga, dogs, cats, and reading horizontally.