Welcome Back to the Enchanted Garden

Long shot of raised beds under blue skies and white fluffy clouds.

By Ann H.

It’s time to plan a visit to the Enchanted Garden at the Miller Branch!  We are thrilled to invite visitors back to the garden beginning Saturday, May 8. Come and see what’s growing in our demonstration area, enjoy the blooms of the season, and feel the calming touch of nature.

How much food can we grow in the Enchanted Garden? This year we plan to find out! Our raised beds will be devoted to growing food to donate to the Howard County Food Bank. You’ll find a variety of lettuce, radish, broccoli, and cauliflower happily growing while we thwart the efforts of a nibbling bunny. The strawberries are bursting with blooms, potato shoots are poking up through the soil, and the peas are reaching for their trellis. We have greens galore in an assortment of bib and leaf lettuce.  Plus, we’re busy preparing more beds for summer crops like tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, and squash.  

Close of young green growing leaves and

A garden bed once devoted to summer annuals will be transformed into an edible landscape. We’re curious about ways to maximize our food yield, provide season-long blooms for the pollinators, and offer beauty to the beholder. Can you picture kale, chard, and basil side-by-side with zinnias, sunflowers, and marigolds? By combining annuals and vegetables in one patch, we hope to create a garden that challenges notions about what makes a garden and what is fitting for the front yard.

Look to the left of the front gate to see our newest garden bed. Thanks to the Howard County Garden Club, we have a new pollinator-themed garden filled with wildlife-friendly native plants and cultivars. Our new garden will support pollinators like bees, butterflies, and moths. We hope it will inspire visitors and budding youth gardeners to garden for wildlife.  

Photo of Enchanted Garden Coordinator Ann Hackeling with a trellis. She's wearing a bright pink shirt, a floral scarf, a blue apron, and a straw hat while smiling at the camera.

Our Enchanted Garden is thriving with the help of many volunteers. We have more weeding and clean-up to do, but we think you’ll enjoy seeing what we’ve accomplished so far. There are new garden beds to behold and so many spring vegetables that you’ll work up an appetite. We look forward to seeing you in the garden soon!

The Enchanted Garden will open during library hours Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 6 pm; Thursday, 10 am – 8 pm. Masks are not required in the Enchanted Garden. Visitors are expected to maintain social distance.

Ann joined the Miller HCLS staff as the Enchanted Garden Coordinator and Instructor in 2012. When not gardening you’ll find her reading, cooking, and exploring trails in the Patapsco River Valley with her husband and dog.

What’s Happening in the Enchanted Garden?

Sunflowers against a bright blue sky, with one of two blossoms beginning its end of season fade. A bright yellow goldfinch sits on the stalk.

By Ann H.

While the Enchanted Garden is temporarily closed to visitors and volunteers, it still manages to be a busy place for nature. Last year, the Enchanted Garden became a certified Wildlife Habitat thanks to the work of the Tween Sprouts (an HCLS youth garden club) and a loyal group of student and Master Gardener volunteers. This year it seems chipmunks, bunnies, butterflies, bees, birds, maybe a fox, plus more unseen critters are enjoying the efforts of our two-legged helpers. Let’s take a peek inside.

Birds helped spread sunflower seeds planted by youth gardeners in spring 2019. Come late this summer goldfinches, bees, and butterflies are feasting on their nectar and seeds!

Close up photo shows bright green mint plants that have begun to flower.

Mint must thrive on neglect! Many common herbs like basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary, and lemon balm are members of the hardy mint family. These herbs and more common mints like chocolate and spearmint are providing nectar for our hungry pollinators. Let your mint reach the flowering stage and pollinators will come.

Common milkweed left unchecked has claimed the back corner of the garden. Since it is the host plant of the monarch butterfly and mega food for a variety of pollinators, I’m enjoying its presence and hoping to see monarch caterpillars devouring the leaves any day.

Monarch butterfly rests on flowers of a summersweet plant.

Monarchs have not been plentiful in the Enchanted Garden so far this summer, but a few make a regular appearance. Thank goodness we have enough native perennials like this Summersweet, to help feed them on their journey.

Though the chore list to restore our Enchanted Garden is a tad long, these sights inspire me to persevere. I am grateful for the work of many in past years and truly look forward to the day we can open the gates to all our garden friends, volunteers, and visitors.

Ann is the Enchanted Garden Coordinator and Research Specialist at the Miller Branch. After nearly ten years with HCLS, she still thinks her position is a dream come true.